The GPM core observatory satellite passed over the Bay of Bengal on May 23, 2017 at 0251 UTC (May 22 at 10:51 p.m. EDT). GPM measured rain falling at a rate of over 108 millimeters or 4.3 inches per hour in some storms reaching heights above 16 km (9.9 miles). Credits: NASA/JAXA, Hal Pierce
The GPM core observatory satellite passed over the Bay of Bengal on May 23, 2017 at 0251 UTC (May 22 at 10:51 p.m. EDT). GPM measured rain falling at a rate of over 108 millimeters or 4.3 inches per hour in some storms reaching heights above 16 km (9.9 miles). Credits: NASA/JAXA, Hal Pierce

NASA Satellite Finds 16-km High Monsoon Storms Over Bay of Bengal

Storms associated with the advancing monsoon in the Northern Indian Ocean’s Bay of Bengal were detected by NASA with the GPM or Global Precipitation Measurement mission core satellite that passed over the Bay on May 23, 2017 at 0251 UTC.

GPM is a joint satellite mission between NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, JAXA. The GPM core observatory satellite flew almost directly above very strong convective storms that were located east of Sri Lanka, which are associated with the approaching Southwest monsoon.

The amount and timing of monsoon rainfall is very important for the country’s economy and several of its satellites keep an eye on approaching monsoon and advise the farmers on their crop patterns.

GPM’s Microwave Imager (GMI) and Dual-Frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) instruments were able to pinpoint the location and intensity of rainfall in the southern Bay of Bengal and found a very heavy rainfall in this cluster of powerful storms. GPM’s DPR Ku Band measured rain falling at a rate of over 108 millimeters or 4.3 inches per hour in some storms, said NASA in a statement.

GPM flew almost directly above very strong convective storms that were located east of Sri Lanka as shown in the image above and storms with a height of 16 kilometre or above signify a strong possibility of the monsoon touching the Indian coast at Orissa, Andhra Pradesh and Tamil Nadu within a week.

At NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, in Greenbelt, Maryland has made the analysis using the GPM satellite’s radar (DPR Ku Band) data to show a 3-D cross section of precipitation in the storms, which threw up many storm tops in the area reaching heights above 16 km (9.9 miles).

The Global Precipitation Measurement mission, an international network of satellites, provides global observations of rain and snow to advance our understanding of Earth’s water and energy cycle, improve forecasting of extreme events, and provide accurate and timely information to directly benefit society.

 

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